Michael Schumacher can lead 'relatively normal life' says former Ferrari boss

by hellomagazine.com

Michael Schumacher may be able to lead "a relatively normal life", according to new reports.

The claim was made by former Ferrari CEO Jean Todt, who is said to have visited Michael in his Switzerland home last week where the injured sportsman is currently recuperating.

"We must assume that Schumacher can lead a relatively normal life again within a short period of time," Jean reportedly said.

 

Michael-Schumacher-

Michael Schumacher and former Ferrari CEO Jean Todt


"We can say he can probably never drive a Formula 1 car again. But he is fighting. His condition improved, and what is just as important is the fact that he is now at home with his family."

Jean, who is now president of the International Automobile Federation, added: "In the past weeks and months, he has made progress in relation to the severity of his injury. But a long and hard road is in front of him. Hopefully things will improve. His family is close to him. He needs time and peace."

A team of 15 carers is said to be looking after Michael in his home, and it is understand that the racing driver is immobile and remains unable to speak.

 

Michael-Schumacher1-

Michael Schumacher suffered a skiing accident shortly before New Year's Eve


Last month Michael, 45, left the University Hospital of Lausanne – where he had been staying since June – to continue his rehabilitation process in his Swiss mansion.

Sabine Kehm, manager to the seven-time Formula One world champion, confirmed the move in a statement, saying that progress had been seen in his condition.

Before this Michael was being treated at the Grenoble University Hospital where he underwent two operations and was placed in a medically-induced coma. He was later taken out of the coma to reduce swelling in his brain.

Michael suffered a skiing accident in France shortly before New Year's Eve last year. He was with his teenage son at the time of the collision, which left the German star with severe head injuries.

More on: