Royalty and statesmen

Wearing his infantry dress uniform, Prince Joachim bends down to kiss his new bride outside the 800-year-old church
Photo: Getty Images
Click on photos to enlarge

A guard-of-honour featuring a sword arch greeted the newlywed couple
Photo: Getty Images

Denmark is filled with joy as Joachim and Marie tie the knot

24 MAY 2008
Click here to see video coverage of the wedding

Visibly moved, Prince Joachim of Denmark wiped away tears as his bride, French-born Marie Cavallier, walked down the aisle of Mogeltonder Church on the arm of her father.

Father-of-two Joachim then kissed his sons, Felix, five, and eight-year-old Nikolai, who had accompanied him to the chapel.

The day was the culmination of a relationship that began in 2005. It is the second marriage for Queen Margrethe's youngest son, a fact touched upon by Bishop Erik Svendsen in his sermon to the couple.

"You have been in love with others before you met," he said, adding: "You naturally have deliberated carefully before deciding to say 'yes' to each other in the full light of publicity."

As well as their family and friends from all over the world, the couple said their "I do's" in front of a watching nation. The ceremony was beamed live to Danish TVs.

Once the formalities were over, the newlyweds left the church to a guard-of-honour, laughing as they walked under an archway of swords.

Events then moved to the Prince's home in Schackenborg Castle, where guests feasted on fjord shrimps, turbot with scallops and beef tenderloin from the estate with summer truffles. Dessert was white and dark chocolate cream accompanied by strawberries.

An octagonal, eight-tiered wedding cake took pride of place. Decorated with small marzipan crowns, French lilies and blown-sugar birds, it had a bottom layer of biscuit covered in dark chocolate and Tahiti vanilla, as well as layers of cream and hazelnut sprinkled with Grand Marnier.