Queen Máxima's father Jorge Zorreguieta leaves hospital to recover at home

by hellomagazine.com

The father of Queen Máxima of the Netherlands, Jorge Zorreguieta, has been released from the clinic where he was being treated for leukemia and is recovering at his home in Buenos Aires, his family confirmed on Thursday.

His sister Maria Zorreguieta said: "My brother is fine and stable. He's recovering at home," reports Fox News Latino.

Queen Máxima's father, who is aged 86, was admitted to the Fundaleu clinic several days ago and is believed to have returned to his home in the Argentine capital on Wednesday.


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Queen Máxima pictured with her husband, father Jorge, mother Maria and brother Martín in 2011



The Dutch queen made a whistle-stop trip to visit her dad at the weekend, travelling to her home country for less than 36 hours.

Máxima arrived late on Saturday night, having taken a commercial flight to the South American nation, accompanied by two bodyguards.

The following day she was spotted at the Fundaleu clinic where it is believed she spent the day with her father, before leaving at around 4:30pm on Sunday to catch her flight back to the Netherlands.

Flying the flag for the country where her husband King Willem-Alexander is from, the elegant Máxima wore orange trousers – the national colour of the Netherlands – and a chic black and white patterned top.

 

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Queen Máxima visited her father in Buenos Aires at the weekend



The Buenos-Aires born royal accessorised with a matching orange clutch, a two-strand bracelet and added height to her figure with orange summer wedges.

The fleeting trip will have been a welcome visit for Máxima and her dad Jorge, who doesn't often see his daughter and wasn't allowed to attend her and Willem-Alexander's royal wedding in 2002, due to his connections to former Argentine president and dictator Rafael Videla. Jorge had served as Minister of Agriculture under the oppressive regime for two years.

Máxima and Willem-Alexander were granted permission to marry by the Parliament, as it was deemed that the future queen had herself done nothing wrong. The government's approval was necessary for Willem-Alexander to stay in line to the Dutch throne.