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Fall in love with Lisbon: Everything Portugal's star city has to offer…

Lisbon's overwhelming charm lies in its customs and rich history. Recognised for its unique Fado music tradition and delectable taste in Portuguese pastry, the spectacular hilltop vistas and seaside views are just moments away from the gentle buzz of the city’s bright lights.

Have the best of both worlds on a city break like no other. Go window-shopping in designer heaven Chiado, stroll through the Old Quarter's historic cobblestone streets and watch the winding bright yellow trams. Or journey slightly further for endless white sands and unspoiled beaches in Cascais.

Whether palaces or parks, castles or clubs, the stark contrast that combines steep secluded hillsides with busy city streets earns Lisbon its reputation as Portugal's star attraction.

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Culture and History
Since Lisbon's rich history dates back more than 3000 years, the area is bursting with culture, myth and colonial history that surround the walls of the city. Discover gothic cathedrals and majestic monasteries and spot ornate Manueline architecture contrasted with impressive street art just by wandering the side streets.

Be sure to pay a visit to Lisbon's most important landmarks like the Rossio Square (Praça de D. Pedro) in the Pombaline Downtown of Lisbon, quaint museums such as the Museum del Fado (Largo do chafariz de Dentro 1) and the medieval National Museum of Ancient Art.

Despite functioning as the main form of transport in Lisbon, hopping on one of the city's quirky yellow trams is also a tourist attraction in itself. Ride on tram 28 to the top of the Alfama district, the oldest region in Lisbon, and set your sights on red rooftops, the Se Cathedral and St George's castle. 

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Areas to visit – Bairro Alto, Belem, Cascais
Nestled in the hilltop district, Bairro Alto is the central district of Lisbon, lined with dozens of boutiques, bars and 1930 era art nouveau cafes this is the perfect place to do a spot of shopping and enjoy Portuguese cuisine.

The waterfront neighbourhood of Belem is equally a popular travel destination, and only located about five miles west of Lisbon's centre. Here you will find the world famous Portuguese custard tarts with cinnamon and icing sugar at the legendary Pasties de Belem. Other must-sees include Jeronimos monastery, Belem tower and Museu de Arte.

And for those wanting to experience coastal views and a sea front, head to Cascais in the Greater Lisbon subregion for a moment of peace. Soak up the sunshine next to crystal waters and sandy beaches which lures in many Lisboetas during the summer.

tram

Cuisine
Dine in the finest restaurants or ‘tascas' (small taverns) dotted across the city and sample the numerous delicacies. With more than 4,500 cod recipes, Lisbon is renowned for the finest fish around and in particular, grilled sardines, which are served during hot summer nights.

Take part in the colourful city’s 'café culture' and satisfy your sweet tooth desires with the never-ending choice of sugary pastries such as pastel de nata while sipping on a bica (expresso).

Sample Portuguese delights in Tasca de Esquina (Domingos Sequeira), Aura Restaurante or be inspired by Jose Avillez' innovative menu at Belcanto, situated in Chiado, the location where modernist writer Pessoa was born.

Portuguese cuisine

Accommodation
During a stay in Lisbon, book into the cosmopolitan Altis Avenida hotel, boasting 70 luxurious rooms and panoramic views. With its close proximity to all main touristic attractions, Avenida Hotel is the epicentre of the city.

Similarly, the five star Altis Belem Hotel & Spa modern interiors make for a city chic experience. The hotel's famous restaurant, managed by michellin-starred chef Jose Cordeiro is the hotel's pride and joy, while the BSpa by Karin Herzoy offers massages and relaxation treatments for the perfect holiday stay.

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