cocktails

You could have cocktails with royalty in Rome - find out how

It's all part of a unique tour from Sapienza Travel

by Chloe Best

Ever wanted to rub shoulders with royalty? Well now you can, thanks to a unique tour package from the new cultural tour company Sapienza Travel. The company is offering customers the chance to sip cocktails with an Italian prince as one of their exclusive, once-in-a-lifetime experiences.

Travellers will have the opportunity to drink cocktails in Rome with Prince Jonathan Doria Pamphilj of the grand papal family. And that's not all, they'll also get private access to the Sistine Chapel and the Pope Nicholas V Chapel in the Vatican, which is normally closed to the public. However the experience does come at a cost; a five-day trip will set you back £2,525 per person.

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You could drink cocktails in Rome with Italian royalty

Other tours grant access to more than 25 private palaces, castles and chapels across Italy, France, Slovakia and Germany, and promise to completely immerse culture-seekers into their chosen theme, with stays in historic hotels and access to some of the world's experts on everything from history to art.

STORY: You can no longer snack next to Rome's most famous landmarks

Budding singers can enjoy a musical masterclass with world-acclaimed soprano Janis Kelly in Bratislava, while art enthusiasts can take a painting masterclass with Tim Wright, the artist who taught Timothy Spall how to paint for the movie Mr Turner, in either Rome, Venice or Florence.

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Unique tours are also available across Italy, including Florence

Sapienza Travel founder and managing director Charles Barber said: "Many European cities have such rich histories and so much to see that visitors are often overwhelmed by them and can leave having missed the essence of a city. I founded Sapienza Travel to give the culturally curious an opportunity to gain more rewarding holiday experiences. To see Rome through the eyes of the papal families; Florence as the Medici lived it and in Venice, to understand the impact of its trade with the Near East and of the Black Death in the art and architecture of the city."

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