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Jamie Oliver recruits Gerard Butler's former personal trainer to lose weight

The celebrity chef admitted he is overweight

Chloe Best

Not only is Jamie Oliver campaigning to tackle childhood obesity, he's also hoping to lose some weight himself. The celebrity chef admitted he wants to lose almost a stone in weight, and has recruited "good friend" and personal trainer Jamie Sawyer to do so.

Speaking to The Mirror, Jamie confessed:  "I work out with Jamie Sawyer – he is super legit and a good friend. I am four kilos... six kilos... heavier than I should be. I will get rid of it in the next couple of months. I was always active as a kid and in pretty good nick until maybe the beginning of my 30s. And then I started to get just a little bit too chunky."

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Jamie Oliver said he needs to lose almost a stone

Jamie's trainer has transformed the physiques of a number of celebrities, including Gerard Butler, as well as working with boxer David Haye at the height of his career. The personal trainer utilises a mix of exercises such as weight training, Pilates and boxing to help his clients get fit and healthy, so Jamie will be sure to achieve his goals fairly quickly.

MORE: Jamie Oliver's wife Jools defends him after campaign backlash

The father-of-four's frank comments about his own weight come just after he launched his #AdEnough campaign in a bid to introduce a watershed on junk food advertising. Jamie encouraged the public to support the campaign by posting a selfie with their hands over their eyes, to show that the only ad-blocker we currently have is to look away. "The science? The more junk food advertising children see, the more of it they eat. Simple," he explained.

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The celebrity chef recently launched his campaign against childhood obesity

Although he has won the support of many parents and a number of celebrities, his wife Jools Oliver defended Jamie against criticism. A small number of people said that factors like poverty played a part in childhood obesity too. "Look to anyone who has commented on the negative side of this we have to start somewhere! We all know these campaigns are made to generate interest and to highlight so many important issues," she wrote.

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